Difference between revisions of "M. jannaschii publication detail with an abstract"

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<div style="text-align: left; margin: 0cm 0cm 3.6pt; text-autospace: ideograph-numeric; word-break: keep-all" align="left"><b><span style="color: #333333; font-size: 11pt">Complete Genome Sequence of the Methanogenic Archaeon, <i>Methanococcus jannaschii</i> </span></b></div>
 
<div style="text-align: left; margin: 0cm 0cm 3.6pt; text-autospace: ideograph-numeric; word-break: keep-all" align="left"><b><span style="color: #333333; font-size: 11pt">Complete Genome Sequence of the Methanogenic Archaeon, <i>Methanococcus jannaschii</i> </span></b></div>
<div style="text-align: left; margin: 12pt 0cm; text-autospace: ideograph-numeric; word-break: keep-all" align="left"><b><span style="color: #333333; font-size: 9pt">Carol J. Bult, Owen White, Gary J. Olsen, Lixin Zhou, Robert D. Fleischmann, Granger G. Sutton, Judith A. Blake, Lisa M. FitzGerald, Rebecca A. Clayton, Jeannine D. Gocayne, Anthony R. Kerlavage, Brian A. Dougherty, Jean-Francois Tomb, Mark D. Adams, Claudia I. Reich, Ross Overbeek, Ewen F. Kirkness, Keith G. Weinstock, Joseph M. Merrick, Anna Glodek, John L. Scott, Neil S.&nbsp;M. Geoghagen, Janice F. Weidman, Joyce L. Fuhrmann, Dave Nguyen, Teresa R. Utterback, Jenny M. Kelley, Jeremy D. Peterson, Paul W. Sadow, Michael C. Hanna, Matthew D. Cotton, Kevin M. Roberts, Margaret A. Hurst, Brian P. Kaine, Mark Borodovsky, Hans-Peter Klenk, Claire M. Fraser, Hamilton O. Smith, Carl R. Woese, J. Craig Venter <a href="http://www.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/abstract/273/5278/1058#FN1"><sup><span style="color: #2e6d8f">*</span></sup></a> </span></b></div>
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<div style="text-align: left; margin: 12pt 0cm; text-autospace: ideograph-numeric; word-break: keep-all" align="left"><b><span style="color: #333333; font-size: 9pt">Carol J. Bult, Owen White, Gary J. Olsen, Lixin Zhou, Robert D. Fleischmann, Granger G. Sutton, Judith A. Blake, Lisa M. FitzGerald, Rebecca A. Clayton, Jeannine D. Gocayne, Anthony R. Kerlavage, Brian A. Dougherty, Jean-Francois Tomb, Mark D. Adams, Claudia I. Reich, Ross Overbeek, Ewen F. Kirkness, Keith G. Weinstock, Joseph M. Merrick, Anna Glodek, John L. Scott, Neil S.&nbsp;M. Geoghagen, Janice F. Weidman, Joyce L. Fuhrmann, Dave Nguyen, Teresa R. Utterback, Jenny M. Kelley, Jeremy D. Peterson, Paul W. Sadow, Michael C. Hanna, Matthew D. Cotton, Kevin M. Roberts, Margaret A. Hurst, Brian P. Kaine, Mark Borodovsky, Hans-Peter Klenk, Claire M. Fraser, Hamilton O. Smith, Carl R. Woese, J. [[Craig Venter]] <a href="http://www.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/abstract/273/5278/1058#FN1"><sup><span style="color: #2e6d8f">*</span></sup></a> </span></b></div>
 
<div style="text-align: left; margin: 12pt 0cm; text-autospace: ideograph-numeric; word-break: keep-all" align="left"><span style="color: #333333"><font size="2">The complete 1.66-megabase pair genome sequence of an autotrophic archaeon, <i>Methanococcus jannaschii</i>, and its 58- and 16-kilobase pair extrachromosomal elements have been determined by whole-genome random sequencing. A total of 1738&nbsp;predicted protein-coding genes were identified; however, only a minority of these (38&nbsp;percent) could be assigned a putative cellular role with high confidence. Although the majority of genes related to energy production, cell division, and metabolism in <i>M.&nbsp;jannaschii</i> are most similar to those found in Bacteria, most of the genes involved in transcription, translation, and replication in <i>M.&nbsp;jannaschii</i> are more similar to those found in Eukaryotes. </font></span></div>
 
<div style="text-align: left; margin: 12pt 0cm; text-autospace: ideograph-numeric; word-break: keep-all" align="left"><span style="color: #333333"><font size="2">The complete 1.66-megabase pair genome sequence of an autotrophic archaeon, <i>Methanococcus jannaschii</i>, and its 58- and 16-kilobase pair extrachromosomal elements have been determined by whole-genome random sequencing. A total of 1738&nbsp;predicted protein-coding genes were identified; however, only a minority of these (38&nbsp;percent) could be assigned a putative cellular role with high confidence. Although the majority of genes related to energy production, cell division, and metabolism in <i>M.&nbsp;jannaschii</i> are most similar to those found in Bacteria, most of the genes involved in transcription, translation, and replication in <i>M.&nbsp;jannaschii</i> are more similar to those found in Eukaryotes. </font></span></div>
 
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Latest revision as of 14:56, 14 November 2010

 

Complete Genome Sequence of the Methanogenic Archaeon, Methanococcus jannaschii
Carol J. Bult, Owen White, Gary J. Olsen, Lixin Zhou, Robert D. Fleischmann, Granger G. Sutton, Judith A. Blake, Lisa M. FitzGerald, Rebecca A. Clayton, Jeannine D. Gocayne, Anthony R. Kerlavage, Brian A. Dougherty, Jean-Francois Tomb, Mark D. Adams, Claudia I. Reich, Ross Overbeek, Ewen F. Kirkness, Keith G. Weinstock, Joseph M. Merrick, Anna Glodek, John L. Scott, Neil S. M. Geoghagen, Janice F. Weidman, Joyce L. Fuhrmann, Dave Nguyen, Teresa R. Utterback, Jenny M. Kelley, Jeremy D. Peterson, Paul W. Sadow, Michael C. Hanna, Matthew D. Cotton, Kevin M. Roberts, Margaret A. Hurst, Brian P. Kaine, Mark Borodovsky, Hans-Peter Klenk, Claire M. Fraser, Hamilton O. Smith, Carl R. Woese, J. Craig Venter *
The complete 1.66-megabase pair genome sequence of an autotrophic archaeon, Methanococcus jannaschii, and its 58- and 16-kilobase pair extrachromosomal elements have been determined by whole-genome random sequencing. A total of 1738 predicted protein-coding genes were identified; however, only a minority of these (38 percent) could be assigned a putative cellular role with high confidence. Although the majority of genes related to energy production, cell division, and metabolism in M. jannaschii are most similar to those found in Bacteria, most of the genes involved in transcription, translation, and replication in M. jannaschii are more similar to those found in Eukaryotes.

 

Microbial genomics